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Saturday, 21.01.2017
18:00h -
Sunday, 19.02.2017

 

2017 / 201701 / 201702 / Ausstellung
Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy
Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste

Lisa Biedlingmaier, San Keller, Vadim Levin, Maria Pomiansky
 




A group exhibition with Lisa Biedlingmaier, San Keller, and Maria Pomiansky in collaboration with Vadim Levin

curated by Dimitrina Sevova and Alan Roth,
curatorial interns Miwa Negoro and Swati Prasad.

Saturday, 21 January – Sunday, 19 February 2017

Opening: Saturday, 21 January at 18:00h
Finissage: Sunday, 19 February at 17:00h

Artist talks and other accompanying events to be announced.

Opening Hours
Wed/Fri 15:00h – 18:00h
Thu 16:00h – 19:00h

The exhibition/project will take place in two parts, of which this is the first:
Part 1: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste
Part 2: Der Prozess / The Trial



Part 1: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste

The focal point is on the relation between the studio, artist labor, art-work, aesthetic practices and their economic conditions. The studio might be a space where a certain degree of autonomy can be detected. The exhibition/project expresses how productivity in art depends on the relation between the artist’s liberty and the economic and social conditions of art production. The studio is part of the productive flow of relations, subjectivities, institutions, places, materials, techniques. At the same time it is in the grammar of autonomy, aesthetics and politics. There are many possible places and non-places of the studio, but it can still be put mainly in two orbits, as an independent space of a solitude where the artwork is produced, and a more open idea of the studio, where the artwork is performed by artist-labor. It is often a shared space, a space of collaboration that engages with the performative domain of the aesthetics and politics of art production and its economic and social reality.

Lacan’s statement “I replaced Freud’s energetics with political economy” goes one step further and openly engages psychoanalysis with the ‘immanent’ critique of liberal capitalist society. Following psychoanalytic practices, the project Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d’artiste incorporates ‘immanent’ critique in the politico-economic relations in the production of art to reflect and analyze in terms of movements and vectors the current conditions of artist-labor and art-work-life social relations.

It also adopts the critique of the political economy as a method to look at the studio space and the practices there, its social and political impact on art, on the labor and life of the artist. To what extent can the studio support the autonomy of the artist’s practices, and what is its emancipatory political potential? Giorgio Agamben attributes to the Situationists an “unavowed awareness that the genuinely political element consists precisely in this incommunicable, almost ridiculous clandestinity of private life.” The art labor and art-work are inevitably incorporated in the critique of a broad socio-economic process. At the same time, they will remain ‘ridiculously clandestine’ attitudes of free labor outside of the labor-power. In this way the project looks at how a return to critique and autonomy practices can perpetuate an emancipatory politics in art. They can be used as a model for an exit from the ‘hegemonic’ capitalist discourse and capitalist production of value. Autonomy practices, aesthetic immanent critique and politics invent new living forms and socio-economic relations outside of capital, like generic commons, undercommons, etc.

The project reflects on self-organized and self-managed aspects of the artist studio space, the conditions of the artist’s labor and the productive process of art-work there. Work is here used not necessarily to designate an art object. The working environment of the studio can be seen from many angles. At the same time, it remains a place where (un)productive forces play disalienated forms of labor in the work and life of the artists. The artist remains a free laborer who betrays the labor-power and slows down, or accelerates a virtuoso productivity.

The project inevitably asks, can the artist make a living from their art? How can they sustain their working environment relying on income from their artistic labor and art-work. Often, they inhabit the studio mostly in the time in-between several other jobs, while the studio is transformed and adapted to multitasked functions driven by project-oriented work, digitalization and internet. The productive process is automated between two applications for grants, in a diversity of institutional commands by e-mail and research work mostly based on Google searches. Being an artist is a day-to-day job of professional occupation, and at the same time a form of life that can scatter into a new sociality.

At the same time there is indeed a reality gap between the image of the autonomous artist and the actual working conditions of living artists, and how their productivity and the conditions of art production are socially evaluated and valued, between the relative ‘autonomy’ of the studio and today’s institutionally driven art, complemented by the erosion of the autonomy of art by different neoliberal dynamics and the restructuring (financialization, digitalization, gentrification) and the ideology of the free market that inevitably machinically signifies the social production and art, too. Although the artist precariat is potentially revolutionary and resistive, Hito Steyerl describes the instrumental precarization in the third stage of institutional critique that leads merely to “integration into precarity” of artist labor and working and living conditions. “What remains hidden in this – a new ‘hidden abode,’ the practicing artist remains outside of the employment.” At the same time, nowadays the art production process has been connected to digital productive flows, automated and highly professionalized by accelerated competition on a global scale, that disempowers the possibilities for collective, community forms of art, work and life.


Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy

The operations of Moral and Politics, Aesthetics and Immanent Critique, invite a re-thinking in the sense of the moral fight (Nietzsche), as Gilles Deleuze puts it in his essay about Foucault: “A man-form, then, appears only in very special and precarious conditions,” as a dissolved man. All form is a combination of all forces, a mix of human and non-human in the process of individuation. This precarious man-form is the extra-human ethical being of politics. Indeed, in Deleuze and Guattari’s words, “Politics precedes being. Practice does not come after the emplacement of the terms and their relations, but actively participates in the drawing of the lines; it confronts the same dangers and the same variations as the emplacement does.”

The notion of autonomy is investigated and reflected from various perspectives, without a model, as it takes place in the realms of aesthetics and of politics, in the social and the personal, art and practices. Autonomy is distinct from knowledge. As an intensification of power it regroups and redistributes. Despite this, the term of Autonomy has become increasingly derided in art and criticised as egotistical or even attributed to the hegemonic western ideology of the individual, as a result of the connection between the autonomy of art and the autonomy of the artist, and the equalization of both to aesthetic autonomy.

Aesthetic autonomy goes beyond the art context to embrace life as a whole. Aesthetic experience as a practice of philosophy has never been necessarily attached to the field of art and the artwork, and has mutated to the concepts of aesthetics of existence and of life as a work of art (in Foucault’s conceptualization) – “existing not as a subject but as a work of art.” The aesthetics of the ephemeral of the event of political subjectivity and of temporary autonomous zones are dispositions of time or of a brain. They draw “new cerebral pathways, new ways of thinking.” As Deleuze says: “I think subjectification, events, and brains are more or less the same thing.” What can emerge from these practices is the creative struggle that is resistance and invention. Art is resistance, too. These new subjectivities are precarious minor social formations, and to the extent that the artist is part of the precariat in the informal economy, they practice aesthetic autonomy, too. Peter Osborne writes that “aesthetic autonomy is indifferent to the art/non-art distinction,” which is close to Jacques Rancière: “To the extent that the aesthetic formula ties art to non-art from the start, it sets that life up between two vanishing points: art becoming mere life or art becoming mere art.” 


Excerpt from the curatorial text by Dimitrina Sevova in collaboration with Alan Roth (in printable format as PDF, 276KB)



Lisa Biedlingmaier

undefined
2014. HD video.


Lisa Biedlingmaier, undefined. 2014. Video still.


For centuries, the studio has been perceived not only in its pragmatic function as a workshop or thought laboratorium but to a much larger extent as a place in which the premises of individual artistic identity can be fathomed.

The interior, whether a home office or a study room, provides clues to the personality living or working there.


Das Atelier wurde über Jahrhunderte nicht nur in seiner pragmatischen Funktion als Werkstätte oder gedankliches Laboratorium registriert, sondern in viel grösserem Masse als ein Ort empfunden, an dem die Prämissen für die individuelle künstlerische Identität ergründet werden können.

Das Interieur, ob Privatzimmer oder Arbeitszimmer liefere Indizien über die in ihm wohnende bzw. arbeitende Persönlichkeit.



San Keller

At Work (Cuckoo)


San Keller, At Work (Cuckoo). 2008–2011. Series of 36 photographs. Studio of Rosen/Wojnar, Berlin 28.06.2010.


In At Work (Cuckoo) lässt sich San Keller von seinen Künstlerfreunden in deren Ateliers und an deren Arbeit fotografieren.


The L-Word - No mas metales
2015. HD video, 56 min.

Der Schweizer Konzeptkünstler San Keller (1971) reist mit der Absicht nach Los Angeles, auf der Strasse einen Kunstsammler anzutreffen, der ein Werk der amerikanischen Pop-Art-Ikone Andy Warhol (1928-1987) aus seiner Sammlung gegen sämtliche Werke des politischen Zeichners und Karikaturisten Martin Disteli (1802-1844) im Besitz des Kunstmuseum Olten tauschen würde.

Auf seinen Streifzügen rund um Hollywood entfernt sich San Keller immer weiter vom ursprünglichen Ziel, einen Sammler zu finden, der einen Warhol gegen den Oltner Disteli-Nachlass tauschen würde. In den Vordergrund rückt stattdessen die Suche – die Suche an sich, oder aber die Suche nach dem Bild. The L-Word - No mas metales ist jedoch auch eine filmische Reflexion über ein mysteriöses L-Word (Los Angeles, Liebe, Langeweile, Loch oder Liberalismus?), über die Suggestionskraft von Bildern, die Macht des Geldes und vor allem über die Freiheit - die Kernthemen Distelis also.



Maria Pomiansky in collaboration with Vadim Levin

In situ studio


The artist’s studio. Photo: Maria Pomiansky. Courtesy the artist.


What is the role of the painter's atelier in contemporary art practice? The archaic features are mixed with the needs of today's life. A painter 's atelier is one of the last bastions of non-computer activities. It can be interpreted as a manifestation of humanity. And it’s not by chance that technique is put back on stage and reworked through the lenses of conceptual art to produce paintings that elaborate on the reality surrounding us.

I would like to produce a painting which would change during the time of the exhibition and would be an attempt to view the atelier as a sacral symbol, a game where the human brain, the hand and the eyes play the leading roles.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Thursday, 26.01.2017
20:00h

 

2017 / 201701
Container City und Kunstverein Wagenhalle e.V., Stuttgart
Lisa Biedlingmaier
 




Aaron Schirrmann (Architekt) und Lisa Biedlingmaier (Künstlerin und Kuratorin) berichten über den aktuellen Stand der Container City und die Arbeit des Kunstvereins Wagenhalle in Stuttgart.

Seit einer Woche laufen die Renovierungsarbeiten an der Wagenhalle, die in 2 Jahren wiedereröffnet werden soll.
Ein Ort an dem seit 2004, über 80 verschiedene Ateliers, Werkstätte, Proberäume und der Ausstellungsraum Kunstverein Wagenhalle ihr temporäres Zuhause hatten.

Der Kunstverein hat jetzt ein Interimsquartier auf dem Gelände vor der Halle aufgebaut. Die meisten Künstler und Kulturschaffenden sind vor Ort geblieben und arbeiten weiter in den ca. 140 Containern und einigen Sonderbauten.

images: Aida Nejad
photography: Ferdinando Iannone

This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Monday, 30.01.2017
19:00h

 

2017 / 201701 / Curatorial Reading Group
Curatorial Reading Group
Session 1




The Curatorial Reading Group is a monthly reading session, aimed at enhancing our creativities in curatorial approaches through a continuous series of discussions. Under the theme of ‘Art and the Notion of Time,’ each session focuses on a selected text from theory to artistic practice.

For the first session on 30 January 2017, we will read and discuss the inspiring book It Had Something to Do with the Telling of Time. Spaces in fiction – Constructs of Reality by Annee Grøtte Viken.

If you are interested in our reading session please contact us! We will write you back with a copy of the book, and warmly recommend you to read it before the session.

Contact: Miwa Negoro (Corner College), miwa.negoro (at) gmail (dot) com

Posted by Corner College Collective

Thursday, 02.02.2017
19:00h

 

2017 / 201702 / Buchvernissage
Book Launch “Mapping Graphic Design History in Switzerland”
Davide Fornari, Robert Lzicar
 


Cover of Mapping Graphic Design History in Switzerland (Triest 2016).


Mapping Graphic Design History in Switzerland is not just another book that retells the success story of Swiss graphic design. It is a collection of eleven selected essays deriving from academic research that explores historical dimensions of graphic design in Switzerland – from producing it, to archiving and exhibiting it.

The book is also an endeavor to open up a space for graphic design history by providing new perspectives, ideas and tools that enable historical research in such a crucial field for Switzerland as graphic design and typography.

On this occasion, the editors Davide Fornari and Robert Lzicar and publisher Triest invite you to celebrate the launch of the book. A presentation of the book will be followed by a number of talks by contributors and sponsors on why they did support / contribute. The evening will end with a toast on the publication.

Program

19:00–19:10 Greeting: Kerstin Forster (publisher at Triest Verlag)
19:10–19:30 Presentation of the book: Davide Fornari, Robert Lzicar (editors of “Mapping Graphic Design History in Switzerland”)
19:30–19:40 Speaker 1: Sarah Owens (ZHdK and Swiss Design Network SDN)
19:40–19:50 Speaker 2: Marina Oliveira (Designer of Visual Essays, Graphic Designer, Zurich)
19:50–20:00 Speaker 3: Peter Vetter (Coande, ZHdK)
20:00–20:10 Speaker 4: Bettina Richter (Poster Collection, MfG - auf Deutsch/in German)
20:10–20:15 Questions & Statements
20:15–21:00 Apéro

Davide Fornari is associate professor at ECAL University of Art and Design in Lausanne, where he leads the research and development sector. He has previously been teacher and researcher at SUPSI University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland.

Robert Lzicar is a designer, educator and researcher. At the HKB Bern University of the Arts, he is head of the MA Communication Design, researcher at the Department of R+D Communication Design, and professor of design history.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Thursday, 09.02.2017
18:00h

 

2017 / 201702 / Performance
Blaumachen
San Keller
 




Zum Feierabend ein Freibier für alle die heute nicht blau gemacht haben.

This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Friday, 10.02.2017
19:30h

 

2017 / 201702 / Buchvernissage
Book launch: Happy Tropics I
Damian Christinger, Michael Schindhelm
 




Book Launch “Happy Tropics” with Michael Schindhelm (author, culture adviser, theatre and film maker), Damian Christinger (curator, Zurich University of the Arts) and students of Zurich University of the Arts.

This book is an attempt to translate new understandings of transcultural connections into a dialogue. Contributions and insights by important actors in the cultural field such as Eugene Tan, Rem Koolhaas, Benson Puah, June Yap, Gwee Li Sui, and Philip Ursprung, Michael Schindhelm and Damian Christinger frame research by students from the Zurich University of the Arts, and create a multi-voiced and multi-faceted approach to understanding the rapidly-changing cultural topographies of Singapore.

Happy Tropics I consists of two parts that run (literally) parallel throughout the book. The first section, “Why Singapore,” focuses on insights from outside the city state, and consists of a conversation between Rem Koolhaas and Michael Schindhelm, an essay by Philip Ursprung, and an artistic contribution by the U5 art collective, among the contributions by the students of the Zurich University of the arts. The second section, “Learning from Singapore,” gives room to different voices from within, featuring interviews with Glen Goei, Beh Swan Gin, Benson Puah, Eugene Tan, and an essay by Gwee Li Sui.

As Singapore becomes a global leader in both the financial and knowledge-production sectors, increasing emphasis is being put on both the production and dissemination of culture in the island-state. While it was still regarded as an “emerging country” two decades ago, it has become one of the leading nations regarding infrastructure, urbanisation, and service industries. The question as to whether arts and culture will follow suit is being closely followed by other nations worldwide who aspire to similar developmental goals. Singapore can be thought of as a kind of laboratory for the enabling, production, education, and consumption of arts and culture. Understanding culture as a mirror of society, instrument of national identification, and site for dialogue and exchange with other cultures allows us to view it as a litmus test for the resilience of an unprecedented societal concept.

Within this framework, Happy Tropics I can be seen as a case study and a laboratory for different approaches to dealing with the challenges of globalization, as the cultural topographies of Singapore are not only changing, but also constituting themselves in our timeframe. Understanding the city as a responsive network that can be harnessed for research and education projects reflects this reality, and encouraged us to come with our students from the Zurich University of the Arts to Singapore, delving into its mesh and trying to learn that seeing eye to eye is so much more important then perceived hierarchies, a concept that is also reflected in the design and structure of this book.

Happy Tropics I is a publication by Michael Schindhelm and Damian Christinger in collaboration with the Zurich University of the Arts, and is classified as the Connecting Spaces Document # 10.

http://www.connectingspaces.ch/happy-tropics-book-launch-2/

Posted by Corner College Collective

Wednesday, 15.02.2017
19:00h

 

2017 / 201702 / Diskussion
L’économie politique de l’atelier d’artiste
Eine Podiumsdiskussion mit Tonjaschja Adler, Delphine Chapuis Schmitz, Vreni Spieser, und Nina von Meiss und Christina Pfander von Mickry3 im Gespräch mit den Kuratorinnen Nadja Baldini, Dimitrina Sevova und Tanja Trampe.

Tonjaschja Adler, Nadja Baldini, Delphine Chapuis Schmitz, Mickry3, Dimitrina Sevova, Vreni Spieser, Tanja Trampe
 


Images, left: Tonjaschja Adler; right: Delphine Chapuis Schmitz.


18:30h doors open
19:00h panel discussion

Die Podiumsdiskussion findet auf Deutsch und Englisch statt.
The panel discussion will be held in German and in English.


[English below]

Tonjaschja Adler, Delphine Chapuis Schmitz, Vreni Spieser, und Nina von Meiss und Christina Pfander von Mickry3 im Gespräch mit den Kuratorinnen Nadja Baldini, Dimitrina Sevova und Tanja Trampe. Danach Plenumsdiskussion mit dem Publikum. Und Suppe und Bar.
Die Podiumsdiskussion reflektiert kritisch aus den unterschiedlichen Perspektiven der geladenen Künstlerinnen, wie künstlerische Arbeit heute unter Post-Studio-Bedingungen geleistet wird, inwieweit die Präkarität und Präkarisierung, die den jetzigen wirtschaftlichen Bedingungen und den finanziellen Strukturen innewohnen, die innerhalb der Kultursphäre operieren, die Kunstproduktion, das Arbeitsumfeld der Künstlerin und ihre Lebenssituation prägen.
Das Augenmerk liegt auf der Beziehung zwischen Studio, künstlerischer Arbeit, Herstellung von Kunst, ästhetische Praktiken und deren wirtschaftliche Bedingungen. Das Studio mag ein Raum mit einer gewissen Autonomie sein. Die Podiumsdiskussion stellt die Frage, auf welche Weise die Produktivität in der Kunst heute abhängt von der Beziehung zwischen der Freiheit der Künstlerin und den wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Bedingungen der Kunstproduktion. Das Studio ist Teil des produktiven Flusses von Beziehungen, Orten, Architektur, Materialien, Techniken und Infrastruktur. Gleichzeitig ist es in der Grammatik der Autonomie, der Ästhetik und Politik. Es gibt viele mögliche Orte und Nichtorte des Studios, und doch findet es sich in zwei hauptsächlichen Umlaufbahnen, als unabhängiger Raum der Einsamkeit, in dem das Kunstwerk produziert wird, und als offenere Vorstellung des Studios, wo das Kunstwerk von der Arbeitskraft der Künstlerin geleistet wird.
Welches ist die Rolle des Studios im städtischen Gewebe, und wir wird seine Unterstützung geplant? Welches ist die Rolle der selbstorganisierten Studios auf der wirtschaftlichen Landkarte, und wie ist die Herstellung von Kunst im Studio heute organisiert?
Wie wirkt sich Kulturpolitik und staatliche Finanzhilfe für Studio aus und formt die Kunstproduktion, wie auch das Leben und die Existenz der Künstlerin? Selbst unter Post-Studio-Bedingungen markiert der Arbeitsraum der Künstlerin eine Zone der Autonomie, wo sich ein ‚nicht-sanktionierender‘ Kontext von Kunstpraktiken und ‚ungezähmten‘ Beziehungen abspielen können. Wie, kann ebenso gefragt werden, kann Gesellschaftlichkeit als erweitertes oder versprengtes Studio betrachtet werden? Wie kann das Studio kooperative Formen und selbstorganisierte Strukturen innerhalb des städtischen Gefüges und der Kunstpraktiken, künstlerische Arbeit, Herstellung von Kunst herbeiführen und gleichzeitig pulsierende Formen des Lebens organisieren?
Welchen Pfad der kritischen Befragung und welche Art von Methodologie lässt sich in einer Recherche über die (Post-) Studio-Bedingungen anwenden, um Phänomene der Destabilisierung des Studios, der Mobilität und immateriellen Produktion zu reflektieren? Und doch kennzeichnet und signifiziert das Studio nach wie vor einen Raum, in dem künstlerische Arbeit geleistet wird, und die Formen der Organisierung des Arbeitsprozesses der Kunstproduktion. Es bleibt verhältnismässig im Schatten des Privatraums und der Schattenwirtschaft, im Gegensatz zum Museum, zum Kunstraum und der Kunst, die sich im öffentlichen Umfeld abspielt.
Wie können Künstlerinnen ihr Arbeitsumfeld aufrechterhalten, gestützt auf ein Einkommen aus ihrer künstlerischen Arbeit und der Herstellung von Kunst? Oftmals bewohnen sie das Studio lediglich im Zeitraum zwischen mehreren anderen Jobs, während das Studio transformiert und an die Multitasking-Anforderungen projektorientierter Arbeit, Digitalisierung und Internet angepasst wird. Der produktive Prozess ist zwischen zwei Eingaben für Stipendien automatisiert in einer Vielfalt von Kommandos über E-Mail und weitgehend auf Google-Suche abgestützter Recherchearbeit. Künstlerin zu sein ist ein Alltagsjob professioneller Beschäftigung, und gleichzeitig auch eine Form des Lebens, die in eine neue Gesellschaftlichkeit versprengt werden kann. Hito Steyerl beschreibt die instrumentelle Präkarisierung im dritten Stadium der institutionellen Kritik, die lediglich zur „Integration“ der künstlerischen Arbeit sowie der Arbeits- und Lebensbedingungen „in die Präkarität“ führt.“ „Was darin verborgen bleibt – eine neue ‚verborgne Stätte‘ – die praktizierende Künstlerin bleibt ausserhalb der Anstellung.“ Desgleichen ist die Kunstproduktion heutzutage an digitale Produktionsflüsse angeschlossen, automatisiert und hochgradig professionalisiert durch die beschleunigte Konkurrenz im globalen Massstab, welche die Möglichkeiten für kollektive, gemeinschaftliche Formen der Kunst, der Arbeit und des Lebens.
Künstlerinnen streben oft und offen danach, in der Stadt billige und grosse Orte zum Arbeiten zu erschliessen. Der Kampf um freien Raum und mehr Räume in der Stadt, wie in Zürich und anderen Städten in den 1980ern, bringt das Studio dazu, im Widerstand gegen Gentrifizierungsprozesse nachzuhallen, der bisweilen gar in der Besetzung von Gebäuden endete. Wie kann es neue Formen des Widerstands eröffnen, und inwieweit sind Künstlerinnen und kulturelle Arbeiterinnen heute imstande, eine revolutionäre Kraft und politische Subjektivität zu leisten, während sich die das Wesen der Arbeit verändert? Wie können sie in diesem sozialen Wandel zurückfordern und verhandeln? Lacans Aussage „Ich habe Freuds Energetik durch die politische Ökonomie ersetzt“ geht einen Schritt weiter und konfrontiert die Psychoanalyse offen mit der ‚immanenten‘ Kritik der liberalen kapitalistischen Gesellschaft. Psychoanalytischen Praktiken folgend, schliesst das Projekt Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d’artiste eine ‚immanente‘ Kritik der polit-ökonomischen Beziehungen in der Produktion von Kunst ein, um die jetzigen Verhältnisse der künstlerischen Arbeit und Kunst-Herstellung-Leben sozialen Beziehungen in Bezug auf Bewegungen und Vektoren zu reflektieren und zu analysieren.
Welche Auswirkung hat das offene Studio als Form der Aktivierung und Mobilisierung von Publiken und andere Art, Kunst zu organisieren? Wie reflektiert das Format des offenen Studios die jetzige Tendenz des internationalen Kunstaustauschs, von Residenzen angetrieben zu werden? Wie wirkt es sich auf den Produktionsprozess aus (Arbeitsbedingungen und arbeitswirtschaftliche Bedingungen)? Wie stellt das Studio ‚andere‘ experimentelle Formen des Ausstellungsmachen zur Schau, die sich in ihm entfalten können?

Ausgewählte und überarbeitete Auszüge aus dem Text von Dimitrina Sevova für die Ausstellung Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste, in Zusammenarbeit mit Alan Roth

Druckfähige Fassung (PDF 98KB)

Diese Podiumsdiskussion ist Teil des Ausstellungsprojekts Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d’artiste.



[Deutsch oben]

Tonjaschja Adler, Delphine Chapuis Schmitz, Vreni Spieser, and Nina von Meiss and Christina Pfander of Mickry3 in conversation with the curators Nadja Baldini, Dimitrina Sevova and Tanja Trampe. Followed by a plenary discussion with the audience. And soup and bar.
The panel discussion critically reflects from the various perspectives of the invited artists how the artist’s labor is performed today under post studio conditions, to what extent the precarity and precarization inherent in the current economic conditions and the financial structures that operate within the cultural sphere signify the art production, the artist’s working environment and living situation.
The focal point is on the relation between the studio, artists’ labor, art-work, aesthetic practices and their economic conditions. The studio might be a space with a certain degree of autonomy. The panel discussion asks how productivity in art depends today on the relation between the artist’s liberty and the economic and social conditions of art production. The studio is part of the productive flow of relations, subjectivities, institutions, places, architecture, materials, techniques, and infrastructures. At the same time it is in the grammar of autonomy, aesthetics and politics. There are many possible places and non-places of the studio, but it can still be found in two main orbits, as an independent space of solitude where the artwork is produced, and a more open idea of the studio, where the artwork is performed by artist-labor.
What is the role of the studio in the urban fabric and how is its public support planned? What is the role of self-organized studios on the economic map, and how is art-work organized in the studio today?
How do cultural policy and state financial support to the studios impact and shape the production of art, and the lives and existence of the artist, too? Even under post studio conditions, the artist’s working space marks a zone of autonomy, where a ‘non-sanction’ context of art practices and ‘unruly’ relations can take place. At the same time, how can sociality be seen as an expanded or scattered studio? How can the studio induce cooperative forms and self-organized structures within the urban tissue and art practices, art labor, art-work and at the same time organize vibrant forms of life.
What path of critical inquiry and what kind of methodology can be applied in a research about the (post) studio conditions, to reflect on the phenomena of unsettling the studio, mobility, and immaterial production? At the same time, the studio still designates and signifies a space where art labor is performed, and the forms of organization of the working process of the art production. It stays relatively in the shadow of the private space and the hidden economy, unlike the museum, the art space or art taking place in the public environment.
How can artists sustain their working environment relying on income from their artistic labor and art-work? Often, they inhabit the studio mostly for a time in-between several other jobs, while the studio is transformed and adapted to multitasked functions driven by project-oriented work, digitalization and internet. The productive process is automated between two applications for grants, in a diversity of institutional commands by e-mail and research work based largely on Google searches. Being an artist is a day-to-day job of professional occupation, and at the same time a form of life that can scatter into a new sociality. Hito Steyerl describes the instrumental precarization in the third stage of institutional critique that leads merely to “integration into precarity” of artist labor and working and living conditions. “What remains hidden in this – a new ‘hidden abode,’ the practicing artist remains outside of the employment.” At the same time, nowadays the art production process has been connected to digital productive flows, automated and highly professionalized by accelerated competition on a global scale that disempowers the possibilities for collective, community forms of art, work and life.
Artists often and openly strive to gain cheap and large places in the city for working. The struggle for free space and more space in the city, as in Zurich and other cities in the 1980s, makes the studio issue resonate within the resistance against gentrification processes, that has sometimes ended up even in the occupation of buildings. How can it open new forms of resistance, and to what extent are artists and cultural workers today able to perform a revolutionary force and political subjectivity when the nature of work is changing? How can they re-claim and negotiate in these social changes? Lacan’s statement “I replaced Freud’s energetics with political economy” goes one step further and openly engages psychoanalysis with the ‘immanent’ critique of liberal capitalist society. Following psychoanalytic practices, the project Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d’artiste incorporates an ‘immanent’ critique of the politico-economic relations in the production of art to reflect and analyze the current conditions of artist-labor and art-work-life social relations in terms of movements and vectors.
What is the impact of the open studio, as a form of activating and mobilizing audiences and a different way of organizing art? How does the format of the open studio reflect the current tendency of international art exchange to be residency driven? How does it impact the process of production (working conditions and labor economic conditions)? How does the studio dis-play ‘other’ experimental forms of exhibition making that can unfold in the studio?

Selected and reworked excerpts from the text by Dimitrina Sevova for the exhibition Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part 1: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste, in collaboration with Alan Roth

Printable version (PDF 94KB)

The panel discussion is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part 1: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste.



Tonjaschja Adler




These aus „ein Essay über die Abstraktionsebene der Kategorie Arbeit“ 2015, Tonjaschja Adler

ARBEIT=KUNST=ARBEIT

Was kann ich unaufgefordert tun?
Wohin nehme ich mein Atelier mit?

Als Künstlerin befinde ich mich auf der „Abstraktionsebene“ der Kategorie Arbeit. Arbeit kann nicht ohne Gesellschaft gedacht werden. Der Begriff der Arbeit wird also von der Gesellschaft in der ich lebe definiert. Heisst das, dass die Schwerpunkte auf die alle wir, die in dieser Gesellschaft leben oder die sich in einer Gruppe dieser Gesellschaft in der man sozialisiert wird und sich befindet, definiert was Arbeit ist ? Worin besteht ihr Wert?
Für fast jede Arbeit gibt es ein Taxierungssystem, auf das man sich mal einigen konnte, aber das durchaus immer wieder zur Diskussion steht. Für die Arbeit der Künstlerin, des Künstlers? Auch.



Delphine Chapuis Schmitz




une terrasse de café, a bookstore a library, the street die Welt, a room of one's own, a place where to be and think freely and do nothing - nothing you have to.
a place where to retreat, the possibility of (if only)
atelier: the whole world, a playground


Vreni Spieser

Why should artists, who are in general earning very little money, pay two rents per month?
It’s kind of ridiculous.

I can’t focus and concentrate in a shared studio, I have to be on my own.
But:
Dialogues or having a counterpart is very important in my working process. It’s contradictory.

I don’t like people saying “Oh, it’s so inspiring to visit you in your studio”.

Since I am working at home, I am kind of isolated.

I am thinking about renting a studio again, but I’m afraid it will cut my flexibility and ability to travel.



Nina von Meiss and Christina Pfander / Mickry3

Mickry 3 was founded in 1998 by Christina Pfander, Dominique Vigne and Nina von Meiss in Zurich, right after they finished their studies in fine arts at F+F School for Art and Media Design.
Their collaboration began with “M3 Supermarkt”. Arranged as an installation with over 1’000 self-made unique objects, the palette ranged from happiness pills to human organs to a female orgasm, all wrapped in cellophane and available at bargain prices. The motto was to produce inexpensive art for everybody while at the same time undermining the functioning of the art business. Somehow this subverting procedure became a slogan of the trio.
Their works often relate to art history and copying, interpreting and re-interpretation is an ever-recurring aspect of their work, which has continued to develop strongly over the years. But what runs through the whole body of work created by Mickry 3 is a sense of humour and a critical but never moralistic attitude towards society.
In 2006 the trio – who works exclusively in the collective – joined the Association of Swiss Sculptors AZB and moved to their conglomerate of workshops and exterior working spaces in the peripheral area of former gasworks in Schlieren. The association, founded in 1983 by a group of sculptors, among which artist Heinz Niederer, settled there in 1984. AZB functions as a self-sustaining association, the protected gasworks area, located on a property of the City of Schlieren, is in possession of the City of Zurich. This overall environment has influenced in many ways the artistic practice of Mickry 3. Beside others, questions towards a “Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d’artiste” include to what extent such a structure, setting and environment can influence the artistic and political self-conception. Not least because the area seems to be an ideal place not only to work – but to spend time.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Sunday, 19.02.2017
17:00h

 

2017 / 201702 / Artist Talk / Performance
Artist presentation and discussion with Maria Pomiansky
and performance Spirits Call by Vadim Levin

Vadim Levin, Maria Pomiansky
 

16:30h doors open

17:00h Artist presentation by Maria Pomiansky, followed by discussion between Maria Pomiansky and curator Dimitrina Sevova.




18:00h Spirits Call, a performance by Vadim Levin. Vadim Levin in a dialogue with a dead artist. The name of the artist will be announced later.


Vadim Levin, Spirits Call. Performance, 2017.


This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part I: Critique de l’économie politique de l’atelier d'artiste.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Friday, 24.02.2017
19:00h -
Sunday, 19.03.2017

 

2017 / 201702 / 201703 / Ausstellung
Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy
Part II: Der Prozess / The Trial

Robert Estermann, Jakob Jakobsen, Lara Jaydha, Jso Maeder, Aya Momose, Josefine Reisch, Saman Anabel Sarabi
 


Invitiation card for the exhibition. Still from Orson Welles’ The Trial, 1962. Graphic design: code flow.


A group exhibition with Robert Estermann, Jakob Jakobsen, Lara Jaydha, Jso Maeder, Aya Momose, Saman Anabel Sarabi & Josefine Reisch

curated by Dimitrina Sevova and Alan Roth,
co-curated by Miwa Negoro and Swati Prasad.


Opening: 24 February 2017, 19:00h

Opening Hours / Öffnungszeiten
Wed/Fri 15:00h – 18:00h
Thu 16:00h – 19:00h


Saturday, 25 February 2017, 17:00h (doors open 16:30h)
17:00h Screening and artist talk by Aya Momose, followed by a discussion between Aya Momose, Miwa Negoro and the audience.
Japanese artist Aya Momose will screen Exchange Diary (2015-; 48 min), made in collaboration with Korean artist Im Heung-soon.
19:00h Discussion between the artists Robert Estermann, Jakob Jakobsen, Jso Maeder, Saman Anabel Sarabi & Josefine Reisch and the curators Dimitrina Sevova and Alan Roth.


Thursday, 2 March, 19:00h
Screening of The Judgment, video by Kosta Tonev, and discussion with the artist.


Saturdays, 4 and 11 March, 14:00h
INTERMEZZO (locus solus), in which the audience is invited to a public visit of Jso Maeder's storage to select a few wrapped pieces or parts of installations, based on their wrapped shape, without seeing them. They will then be transported to Corner College for a public mis a nu par un objet.

14.00h: Meet at Bhf. Oerlikon, bus stop 62 direction “Schwamendingerplatz”, or
14.15h: Werkerei Schwamendingen, Luegislandstr. 105, 8051 ZH (Eingang Halle)
17.30h: Corner College (le public mis a nu par un objet)


Sunday, 19 March, 16:00h
Celebrating high times on a Sunday afternoon with a small reading out of the book Josefine, a special high time music set, some tea and gin. high times at Corner College: http://www.hightimepublishers.com


“The machine has to be rediscovered under the sensibility which is no more than a theatrical effect of it.” (Jean-François Lyotard) 1
“Someone must have traduced Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning.” Despite that “K. claims to be innocent and doesn’t even know the Law,” he has been convicted.

The novel Der Prozess by Franz Kafka is appropriated for the title and gives the direction of the second part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Written between 1914 and 1915, it pulls the reader into a maze of ambiguous biopower entity control by a remote authority, where the nature of the crime is never revealed to either the character Josef K. or the reader. The world is subject to rules and obeys laws – there is order in this world, and knowledge of this world comes by knowledge of its ‘law,’ as Isaac Newton might have said. At the same time, it is haunted by a radical instability. Laws can change. They can be valid for a time but not eternally. The novel remained uncompleted, in a state of ever incompleteness, which turns out to be a concept. Some lines cross over between The Trial and In the Penal Colony, a short story written in October 1914 and published 1919, which describes a sophisticated machine, a device of torture and execution that carves the sentence on the skin of the condemned prisoner before letting him die, all in the course of twelve hours. Kafka, who himself studied law and performed an obligatory year of unpaid service as a law clerk for the civil and criminal courts, was obsessed with the system of justification and the process of justice, of law and aesthetics.

“Baumgarten published his Aesthetica, the first aesthetics, in 1750. Kant would say of this work simply that it was based on an error. Baumgarten confuses judgment, in its determinant usage, when the understanding organizes phenomena according to categories, with judgment in its reflexive usage when, in the form of feeling, it relates to the indeterminate relationship between the faculties of the judging subject.” (Lyotard)

The flashing K-function in the middle is a micro intra-process of reflective actions in a pre-reflexive impersonal consciousness – the real(ity) of virtuality, the power to affect and to be affected, what Deleuze defines to be a theater without a stage. There is no personal inputs by the actors, who do not embody characters, but are only masks behind which there is nothing, just another mask. Their performance of repetitive clothing veils the plane, and is the collective acting of the three avatars Percept, Affect, Concept, which constitute the forces of individuation and the positive estrangement or displacement that clothe the event and transform it.
In Hegel’s negative dialectics, they are Abstract, Negative, Concrete, or Immediate, Mediated, Concrete. In Deleuze, they are transformed into the positive affirmation of No! The immanence evokes the masks and hiding, crime, and the false (the fancy, or funky). The politics of justice, which is not only in the ethical but also in the aesthetic domain, deals with the distribution of force between the layers of violence and control.

The exhibition tests the ‘other’ logic of Labor of negativity (Hegel), which resonates in Karl Marx’s Theories of Surplus Value, in which he constructs the notion of an “other” to “consciousness” or an “other” to “productive” labor as the case may be. The ability of labor to recognize itself in terms of its own otherness, or to ‘create a void in front of themselves.’ (Althusser) Only in the void can solidarity become concrete. There is a striking proximity between the theory of surplus value and the aesthetic sublime, that in the economy of translation comes even closer the politics, aesthetics and economics.

Excerpts from the curatorial text by Dimitrina Sevova, in collaboration with Alan Roth.

We also refer you to the first section of the curatorial text for Part I of this exhibition project, which applies to both chapters.



Robert Estermann

Out of the Fog
2016. Video, HD, 20′35″, looped.




I let the rider ride. I set up a spectacle („I“ not being a less speculative claim than „spectacle“). Everywhere (prism-like), are uncounted drum-like cylinders (to use an image) with reflecting surfaces autonomically revolving around themselves, deflecting the light from all the other cylinders. The wobbling „man with the movie camera“ is just one of these revolving cylinders in this beach-scape. There is no relationship between them – none. Out of the fog is being recorded just after sunrise. Coming out from the cold into the warm, the glasses of the camera are foggy when starting recording. During the video, the fog on the glasses is slowly fading away. Speaking of revolving cylinders, the earlier work Distant Riders consists of a larger-than-life model of a zoetrope, a revolving cylinder with vertical slices on it, one of the first cinematographic devices.

„In this larger-than-life zoetrope, the individual riders merge, so to speak, into a single rider. The landscape in the background of the nine photographs also seems to coalesce into a hyper-landscape. The background does not refer to a concrete geography more closely defined in temporal and spatial terms, but is rather the visual correspondence of a more diffuse kind of “beach-likeness” with a heavily metaphorical element: distance, culturally protected zone, state of emergency. Once again we are dealing not with a literally political discourse - for which read sexually reformist, generally “liberationist” – although it is also possible to discern an atmosphere of this kind in Distant Riders. This atmosphere is produced by the hallucinatory effect of the signifiers of the 1970s which Estermann is quoting here, apparent in the slightly voyeuristic gaze with which the riders enter the field of vision. One consequence of this hallucinatory treatment of signs may be that another context interposes itself over the sexually reformist and generally “liberationist” discourse of the 1970s: the question of the economic, political or even erotic relationship between humans and animals. But how does this theme arise, when it is neither formulated as an ethical programme nor idealised as a mythical unity from the past? As has already been discussed, the slight sexualisation of the motif of the girl rider is too faint to locate the sequence of images in the sphere of the obscene, let alone the perverse. And the atmosphere of the images, with their location in a distant, undefined coastal zone is too restrained to be subjected to a moral discourse. One key may be the landscape. Its significance as a trope may be better understood if we compare it with the function of the scenic refuge zone commonly featured in dystopias: usually this is portrayed as a zone contrasting with the civilised space, which is why it is depicted alternately as an inaccessible desert far from city life, as in Brave New World, as a hidden, protected forest at the end of the last railway line as in Fahrenheit 451, or as a distant coastal zone as in Distant Riders. This counter-world is rich in sensations and full of sensual freshness (in Fahrenheit 451, this is represented by the constant light snowfall in the protected zone of the forest). But as it is freed from the everyday, and its inhabitants are often in a kind of temporally and/or culturally exceptional condition, there is always something unreal – phantasmatic – about the counter-world. This makes its psychological function all the more important: it allows the citizens to experience sensomotoric renewal or even awakening (as opposed to social anaesthesia), psychical continuity (as opposed to schizoid fragmentation), and develop ethical care (as opposed to moral cynicism).“
Excerpt from: Improper Thinking by Daniel Kurjakovic
in: Robert Estermann, Pleasure, Habeas Corpus, Motoricity. The Great Western Possible, ed. Susanne Neubauer, Kunstmuseum Luzern, Museum of Art Lucerne, edition fink, Zurich, 2007, ISBN 978-3-03746-105-1


Scenic Tongical
2015, two artist’s newspapers, concept with Georg Rutishauser, Edition Fink, Zürich.






Jakob Jakobsen

Antiknow Scene 2. The Body Event (Plumbing). On improvisation, unlearning and antiknow
2013-2017. Work-papers from the Antiknow Research Group and one speaker playing unskilled music. From Antiknow. A pedagogical theatre of unlearning and the limits of knowledge. Directed by Jakob Jakobsen.




The installation Antiknow is a collective effort into unlearning and nonknowledge as critical strategies. This, in a time where institutional and frozen forms of knowledge and learning shaped by economic forces increasingly characterise education and society in general. The term ‘Antiknow’ was originally introduced by John Latham as his course title for the Antiuniversity of London in 1968. It is doubtful whether this course ever took place.

During his six-month residency at Flat Time House, starting in April 2013, visual artist Jakob Jakobsen engaged in elaborating possible meanings and consequences of the term Antiknow in the current context of so-called knowledge economy. Jakobsen set up the Antiknow Research Group, involving young artists from FTHo’s MFI Graduate Group as well as a number of artists, writers and therapists with whom Jakob has collaborated for many years. This led to a series of meetings focusing on Antiknow in relation to work, politics, art and resistance. Marina Vishmidt, Maria Berrios, Howard Slater and John Cunningham were invited to reflect on specific themes within these fields of social practice. Also involved in the group were John Hill, Mary Vettise, Henrik Heinonen, Claire Louise Staunton, Katriona Beales, Mohammad Namazi, Danny Hayward, amongst other incidental participants.




This installation is one of the consequences of Antiknow and involves experiments into drama for non-actors, unskilled music and free drawing. The installation refers to FTHo as a ready-made stage, using as a point of departure the anthropomorphic scheme that John Latham proposed for the building, where each room is dedicated to a specific part of the body: The Mind, The Brain, The Body Event (Plumbing), and the Hand. In the space, a mechanical theatre was developed. The various themes investigated by the Antiknow Research Group are presented as a drama (or anti-drama) between sets of loudspeakers and synchronised lighting. The scripts have been produced collectively using transcriptions of the Antiknow Research Group meetings. The improvised/unskilled music is produced together with Paul Abbott and Gabriel Humberstone.



Lara Jaydha

Broken and open
2017. Moving Image | A series of digital collages (work in progress)




We reach out for a real connection to stay afloat in a sea of submerged emotions. From a deep sense of longing for connection, comes the desire to open and share parts of ourselves. We allow ourselves to be vulnerable and in doing so realize the fragility of our existence. There is an attempt to hold on to the present but everything keeps slipping away. Endings are often unresolved.

This existential truth is terrifying but at the same time, I find there is a sense of beauty and calm in it. I am interested in exploring how we perceive the idea of fragility and its association with gender, form and stereotypes. Why is it looked at a sign of weakness? How can we change this notion? Can we look at it without judgment? Could it symbolize a source of inner strength?



Jso Maeder

INTERMEZZO (locus solus)
2017. Two visits to the artist's storage, on 4 and 11 March 2017. Public mis a nu par un objet.


B°N-BATTERIE
2017. Video installation.




B°N-BATTERIE. amuse-um/TRICKSTER’S TANK

„We are getting rid of ownership“ - John Cage, „Silence“

The trickster, showing up like sort of keeper of the gap as far as he widens out a line normally/normatively marking a dualities’ explicit distinction/discrimination, that appearingly determines and legitimises a difference between two positions like also hierarchic classification (true/contingent, active/passive, dominant/submitted to etc.), to a proper area in between (thus: a gap), compromising/corrupting these positions and so far the ‚system’ of segregations establishing them as obligatory rules valid by its law/language.

Therefore, like a dissimilation by not correctly choosing a position but taking the gap, the trickster breaks the dialectic matrix of a historiography basically reflecting differences as functions of volition and, by consequence, a notion of rationalism of decision making character, whose logics always justify that some corpus has/is to rule: a fix scheme of continiouity or change in an antagonistic scenario, succession or revolving replacement regarding dominant positions as given by an abstract order within rulers/winners and victims/loosers (reproduced in terms of ‚culture & science‘ by modern disciplinarity in theory like economics as a referential construction of social efficiency). So an agent provocateur, if on purpose or not, disobidient and without respect in a way of not reaching any given part in such dispositions, one hardly can localise the trickster’s ambitions or motivations.

Like an analog concept of dis-sense and an incongruousness under that aspect of being regardless of culturally prevalent principles/the institution’s régimentality, his trouble making behaviour/inter-actement is morelike similar to a setting/display like the one of bricolage’s (a way of disobidience in/through matters of knowledge in comparison to the ingenieur/professional standards): what is brought together/assembled and taking place in a combination, is not functionally predefined by controlling instances nor can consequently become conclusion of this kind - there’s more the occasion/opportunity than a goal in the bricoleurs parapractice, a non-repetitve making of also temporally, not a stepwise efficient development from a to b, or a specific sense that predetermines logically the actions, which also and finally means that they remain conflicting as they cannot automatically be assumed as useful being connected with an intentionally positive assertion.

Text: Jso Maeder



Aya Momose

Lesson (Japanese)
2015. Video, HD, 7′16″, looped.




Employing theatrical techniques, Momose often depicts situations in which voices and bodies diverge, or departures from stated intentions, to generate new shades of meaning. In this work, in the bottom of the screen, there is a Japanese written with a roman character / pronunciation and English translation distorted as an “(fictional) Educational Video for Japanese Language Learners”. The sign language is false after all, the definition and the context which the gesture and the voice (sound) sends becomes separated eventually. The separation is suddenly broad between the expression on her face and the voice, and the parole subjective becomes ambiguity / multiple. Here, there’s a fight for ethnicity and the language, between the sorrow and the grievously of the oppressed / enforced, and the cruelty and deception by the oppressing / enforcing. Beyond its non-expression mask, there’s an alternation theater made by their change of the voice’s intonation.


To Cuddle a Goat, a Poor Grammar Exercise
2016. Single channel video, HD, 13′50″.




Distinguished by its adroit ability to overturn the link between voice and body, Momose’s works have dealt with misunderstandings and discrepancies associated with communication, and reversals in the relationship. In the recent work, To Cuddle a Goat, a Poor Grammar Exercise, which includes scenes filmed in Mongolia, she explores different approach to the previous, and expresses the ambiguous nature of its subjects and the uncertainty of relationships with others. The work implies the oppressed subjects and bodies in the history beyond any boundaries.



Saman Anabel Sarabi & Josefine Reisch

How to sing in the midst of the capitalization of art: the desirable table of Josefine. An orientation device
2017. Installation, table, cloth.




Saman Anabel Sarabi and Josefine Reisch have drafted their own orientation device to orient themselves through the cliffs and institutions, waters and archives, mountains and walls, cities and channels, forests and schools, - finally through the horizontalities and flatnesses of 2017. Extending, stretching and flipping the semi-autobiographical short story of Franz Kafka titled Josefine die Sängerin oder das Volk der Mäuse they use their rather specific orientation device to articulate questions on the autonomy of art in our time within which the capitalization of art has been already fully articulated. Through the perspective and voice of Josefine and with the help of her device they will put urgent questions on the table in the near future, starting at Corner College on 24 February 2017.


Posted by Corner College Collective

Saturday, 25.02.2017
17:00h

 

2017 / 201702 / Artist Talk / Diskussion
Screening, artist talks, discussion
With Aya Momose, Robert Estermann, Jakob Jakobsen, Jso Maeder, Saman Anabel Sarabi & Josefine Reisch and the curators

Robert Estermann, Jakob Jakobsen, Jso Maeder, Aya Momose, Saman Anabel Sarabi
 


Aya Momose in collaboration with Im Heung-soon, Exchange Diary. 2015-, 48 min.


Doors open 16:30h

17:00h Screening and artist talk by Aya Momose, followed by a discussion between Aya Momose, co-curator Miwa Negoro and the audience.
Japanese artist Aya Momose will screen Exchange Diary (2015-; 48 min), made in collaboration with Korean artist Im Heung-soon.

19:00h Discussion between the artists Robert Estermann, Jakob Jakobsen, Jso Maeder, Saman Anabel Sarabi & Josefine Reisch and the curators Dimitrina Sevova and Alan Roth.

This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part II: Der Prozess / The Trial.


Aya Momose

Exchange Diary
2015-. Video, HD, 48′09″. In collaboration with Im Heung-soon.

Taking the form of a visual diary, Exchange Diary is a collection of short films recorded and exchanged by two artists over a year, using a unique way in which each artist filmed a short video and sent it to their collaborator who then added their own narration based on their impressions of the visual images. This work incorporates each artist’s personal interpretation of the images combining the differences and similarities of their cultural, social and political values.

Initially, each artist shot a short video of their everyday lives or a place they had visited, and then sent the video to their collaborator. The other artist then watched the video, and added their own narration based on their impressions of the visual images. This artwork incorporates each artist’s personal interpretation of the images combining the differences and similarities of their cultural, social and political values.

Following the screening, Momose will introduce her artistic practices dealing with the issue related to one’s body and voice, including Lesson (Japanese).

Posted by Corner College Collective

Monday, 27.02.2017
19:00h

 

2017 / 201701 / Curatorial Reading Group
Curatorial Reading Group
Session 2




The Curatorial Reading Group is a monthly reading session, a platform for contextualizing curatorial approaches and discourse through a continuous series of readings and discussions. Under the theme of ‘Curating, the Curatorial, and the Notion of Time,’ each session of the first season focuses on a selected text from theory to artistic practice.

This upcoming second session we will read the essay Time and Matter by Jean-François Lyotard, which was part of his input into his philosophical seminar following his landmark exhibition at Centre Pompidou in Paris in 1985, Les Immatériaux, and reflects on the philosophical ideas behind that exhibition. The exhibition inspired an entire generation of relational aesthetics, both curators and artists, from Nicolas Bourriaud to Jens Hoffmann, from Philippe Parreno to Pierre Huyghe, as well as the post-digital discourse and new media art context, with theoreticians and curators like Andreas Boeckmann and Yuk Hui.

You can download the text from here. If you are interested in joining our reading session, it is recommended that you to read it before.




As additional reading further contextualizing Lyotard's text, we recommend the short essay by John Rajchman, Les Immatériaux or How to Construct the History of Exhibitions, Tate Papers No.12 (Landmark Exhibitions Issue)
http://www.tate.org.uk/research/publications/tate-papers/12/les-immateriaux-or-how-to-construct-the-history-of-exhibitions

From John Rajchman's text:
Les Immatériaux was a ‘presentation of ideas’ in the specific sense of ‘presentation’ and ‘idea’ which Lyotard was trying to articulate at the time. It thus linked to another striking aspect of Lyotard’s curatorial experiment – the role and nature of accompanying research, or the role of ‘ideas’ and their ‘address’ in the style of philosophical teaching then current in Paris. With Les Immatériaux, the philosophical seminar would enter into the context of museum research, creating new relations which Lyotard would later evoke in his account of the experience. In the ‘open’ seminar, he would present ideas put forward in a suggestive philosophical text called Time and Matter, later published in a collection of essays entitled The Inhuman. The essay makes interesting reading today, in light of the current interest in exhibitions: in it, Lyotard sets out the larger philosophical ‘idea’ he hoped to ‘present’ through Les Immatériaux. What becomes clear is that Lyotard’s title concept of ‘immateriality’ was different from that of the ‘dematerialisation of art’ associated with the presentation of ideas in what came to be called ‘conceptual art’, and, in particular, ‘institutional critique’. The question thus arises of how this idea and this exhibition are related to that earlier ‘conceptual’ moment in the ‘dramatisation of information’, when the whole idea of the exhibition (or ‘presentation’) was rethought in a manner often opposed to a certain kind of Kantian aestheticism.”






An interview with the philosopher by Bernard Blistène published in Flash Art on the occasion of the exhibition in 1985 provides further background to the thinking behind the exhibition.

And Yuk Hui talks about the updated context of Les immatériaux in the post-digital discourse:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13EdYtfmJ0A

For the March session we propose to collectively select a text, possibly from the book 30 years after Les Immatériaux by Yuk Hui and Andreas Broeckmann.




This book features a previously unpublished report by Jean-François Lyotard on the conception of Les Immatériaux and its relation to postmodernity. Reviewing the historical significance of the exhibition, his text is accompanied by twelve contemporary meditations. The philosophers, art historians, and artists analyse this important moment in the history of media and theory, and reflect on the new material conditions brought about by digital technologies in the last 30 years.

Texts by Daniel Birnbaum, Jean-Louis Boissier, Andreas Broeckmann, Thierry Dufrêne, Francesca Gallo, Charlie Gere, Antony Hudek, Yuk Hui, Jean-François Lyotard, Robin Mackay, Anne Elisabeth Sejten, Bernard Stiegler, and Sven-Olov Wallenstein.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Thursday, 02.03.2017
19:00h

 

2017 / 201703 / Diskussion / Installation
Temporary video installation The Judgment by Kosta Tonev, presentation and discussion with the artist
Kosta Tonev
 




18:30h: Doors open

A temporary video installation of The Judgment by Kosta Tonev will be on display all evening.

19:00h: Presentation by Kosta Tonev, and discussion with the artist





Kosta Tonev

The Judgment
2011, dual-channel video, 4 min 44 sec.

The video tells the story of a police roadblock. An artist has illegally appropriated the object transforming it into an exhibition piece. Shortly thereafter a police team enter the gallery where it is on display, and repossess it.
The first screen of the video installation presents the story as seen through the eyes of the cleaning lady who was the sole witness of the event. In the second, a group of actors impersonate the characters of her story.


The Judgment
2011, 2-Kanal-Videoinstallation, 4 Min 44 Sek.

Das Video erzählt die Geschichte eines Gegenstandes. Ein Künstler stiehlt eine Scherensperre von der Polizei und stellt sie danach in einer Galerie aus. Eines Tages wird die Putzfrau der Galerie von einer Gruppe von PolizistInnen überrascht, die ihre Scherensperre zurückfordern.
Im ersten Kanal dieser Videoinstallation erzählt die Putzfrau von dem Ereignis. Im zweiten werden die Personen aus ihrer Erzählung von SchauspielerInnen dargestellt.


This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part II: Der Prozess / The Trial.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Saturday, 04.03.2017
14:00h

 

2017 / 201703 / Performance
INTERMEZZO (locus solus)
First visit

Jso Maeder
 


Video still of Jso Maeder - Der Philosoph, interviewed in his storage space, by Corinne Wiegand (director, editor) and Sarah Zürcher (camera).


INTERMEZZO (locus solus), in which the audience is invited to a public visit of Jso Maeder's storage to select a few wrapped pieces or parts of installations, based on their wrapped shape, without seeing them. They will then be transported to Corner College for a public mise a nu par un objet.

14.00h: Meet at Bhf. Oerlikon, bus stop 62 direction “Schwamendingerplatz”, or
14.15h: Werkerei Schwamendingen, Luegislandstr. 105, 8051 ZH (Eingang Halle)
17.30h: Corner College (le public mis a nu par un objet)

This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part II: Der Prozess / The Trial.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Wednesday, 08.03.2017
20:00h

 

2017 / 201703
Zine – to March, Clandestine Life of the BoycottGiiirls! 2017




Zine – to March, Clandestine Life of the BoycottGiiirls! 2017

Mit Beiträgen von / With contributions by
Tonjaschja Adler, Madeleine Amsler, Ariane Andereggen, Nicole Bachmann, Martina Baldinger, Mirjam Bayerdörfer, Marina Belobrovaja, Sofia Bempeza, Denise Bertschi, Ursula Biemann, Klara Borbély, Johanna Bruckner, Patricia Bucher, Sarah Burger, Françoise Caraco, Bettina Carl, Delphine Chapuis Schmitz, Teresa Chen, data | Auftrag für parasitäre* Gastarbeit, Brigitte Dätwyler, Kadiatou Diallo, Bettina Diel, Mo Diener, Quynh Dong, Marianne Engel, Klodin Erb, Anne-Laure Franchette, Anna Francke, Ipek Füsun, Monica Germann, Clare Goodwin, Co Gründler, Gabriela Gründler, Sabine Hagmann, Marianne Halter, Andrea Heller, Samia Henni, Seda Hepsev, Anke Hoffmann, Cathérine Hug, Patricia Jacomella, Monica Ursina Jäger, Sophie Jung, Anastasia Katsidis, Verica Kovacevska, Isabelle Krieg, Sandra Kühne, Georgette Maag, Julia Marti, Federica Martini & Petra Elena Köhle, Angela Marzullo, Maya Minder, Rayelle Niemann, Caroline Palla, Ursula Palla, Katherine Patiño Miranda, Leila Peacock, Cora Piantoni, Annaïk Lou Pitteloud , Maria Pomiansky, Elodie Pong, Isabel Reiss, Marion Ritzmann, Ana Roldán, Aoife Rosenmeyer, Dorothea Rust, Margit Säde, Saman Anabel Sarabi, Julie Sas, Lisa Schiess, Annette Sense, Dimitrina Sevova, Francisca Silva, Veronika Spierenburg, Vreni Spieser, Claudia Spinelli, Marion Strunk, Milva Stutz, Una Szeemann, Lena Maria Thüring, Yota Tsotra, Jana Vanecek, Anne Käthi Wehrli, Nives Widauer, Martina-Sofie Wildberger, Angela Wittwer, Sophie Yerly.

Konzept und Realisierung / Concept and realization: Nadja Baldini, Dimitrina Sevova, Tanja Trampe

Herausgegeben von / Published by Corner College Press

[English below]
Vor dem Hintergrund der gegenwärtigen politischen Lage und in Solidarität mit den weltweiten Protesten von Frauen gegen Sexismus, Rassismus, Gewalt, Homophobie, religiöse Intoleranz, Klimawandel und ökologische Ungleichheit haben wir Künstlerinnen und Theoretikerinnen eingeladen, je einen A4-Druckbogen Querformat (bzw. zwei A5-Seiten Hochformat) beizutragen, Text oder Bild/Zeichnung, schwarz-weiss.

Veranstaltung im Corner College am 8. März um 20:00h, mit einer Vorschau-Slideshow der Druckbogen des Zines, und DJ-Sets von Monica Germann und DJ Sweatproducer. Die Einnahmen von der Bar gehen an die Druckkosten.

DJ Sweatproducer:
Strassengeräusche, Haushaltslärm, Trompeterinnen in den Wohnungen.
Das Denken und die Gefühle scheinen jetzt schon zu laut zu dröhnen, Hauswänden und Böden zittern und knacken.
Gebüsch im Wind.
Schimpfen durchs Fenster hinaus, Lieder, Gedichte und furiose Reden, dringen zu den Nachbarinnen hoch.
Durch die Luft, so dominant, man hört es, schon den kleinsten Mucks!


Zine-Vernissage und Auktion am 1. Mai 2017 im Corner College.

[Deutsch oben]
Against the background of the current political situation and in solidarity with the worldwide protests of women against sexism, racism, violence, homophobia, religious intolerance, climate change and ecological inequality, we invited artists and theoreticians to contribute one A4 landscape format spread each (or two pages A5 portrait format), either text or image/drawing, black and white. The income from the bar will go towards the printing costs.

Event at Corner College on 8 March at 20:00h, with a pre-launch slideshow of the spreads of the zine and DJ sets by Monica Germann and DJ Sweatproducer.

DJ Sweatproducer:
Street sounds, household noise, women trumpetists in the apartments.
The thinking and feelings seem already now to buzz, as house walls and floors shake and crash.
Bushes in the wind.
Railing out the window, songs, poems and furious speeches reach the neighbors upstairs.
Through air, so dominant, one can hear it, even the slightest sound!


Zine release and auction on 1 May 2017 at Corner College.


Posted by Corner College Collective

Friday, 10.03.2017
18:00h

 

2017 / 201703 / Lecture
Guest Talk of Programme in Curating CAS/MAS ZHdK
Marc Streit: Zurich Moves!




Talk organized by the Postgraduate Programme in Curating CAS/MAS ZHdK in collaboration with Corner College.

Marc Streit is currently the associate artistic director at Tanzhaus Zürich and founder of zürich moves! festival for contemporary arts practice in performing arts. As freelance curator he has mandates for various institutions in Europe and the US. He is an alumnus of the Postgraduate Programme in Curating.

The current manifestations of contemporary dance and its fringe areas build global bridges through the physical, aesthetic and idiosyncratic interpretation as well as the visualization of socially relevant topics. Contemporary dance inspires and is inspired and often calls for dialogue beyond the physical performance.

http://www.zurichmoves.com
http://www.tanzhaus-zuerich.ch

This event on the on-curating mailing archive: http://us4.campaign-archive2.com/?u=97fd3828d94e99dfeceaa8b3b&id=04632005d8

Posted by Corner College Collective

Saturday, 11.03.2017
14:00h

 

2017 / 201703 / Performance
INTERMEZZO (locus solus)
Second visit

Jso Maeder
 


Video still of Jso Maeder - Der Philosoph, interviewed in his storage space, by Corinne Wiegand (director, editor) and Sarah Zürcher (camera).


INTERMEZZO (locus solus), in which the audience is invited to a public visit of Jso Maeder's storage to select a few wrapped pieces or parts of installations, based on their wrapped shape, without seeing them. They will then be transported to Corner College for a public mise a nu par un objet.

14.00h: Meet at Bhf. Oerlikon, bus stop 62 direction “Schwamendingerplatz”, or
14.15h: Werkerei Schwamendingen, Luegislandstr. 105, 8051 ZH (Eingang Halle)
17.30h: Corner College (le public mis a nu par un objet)

This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part II: Der Prozess / The Trial.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Friday, 17.03.2017
18:00h

 

2017 / 201703 / Lecture
Guest Talk of Programme in Curating CAS/MAS ZHdK
Tenzing Barshee: New Projects


Student Art Collective, The Lesson of the Master, 2015


Talk organized by the Postgraduate Programme in Curating CAS/MAS ZHdK in collaboration with Corner College.

On March 17, Tenzing Barshee's talk at the Postgraduate Programme will discuss and compare the following projects: On March 23, the exhibition Der Verdienst. 2014-2017 will open at the project space Oracle in Berlin. It’s a follow-up project to an exhibition titled Le Mérite. 2014-2016, which happened last October in Paris. The two exhibitions will resemble and question each other. Le Mérite reflected on the adolescence of power—how authority is claimed and in which formats it is established—while the individual experiences trauma collectively. There was a focus on a couple of polemic motifs such as construction, fabrication and abstraction by example of written, published and authored works. Der Verdienst will mimick Le Mérite. Le Mérite was afraid that Der Verdienst might happen. The first project was all about testing limits. The second one tries to draw the line.

Der Verdienst. 2014-2017 features the work of Carla Accardi, Andrea Büttner, Angeletti/Rossetti, Alexia Cayre, Paul Collins, Timothy Davies, Buck Ellison, Marina Faust, Rochelle Feinstein, Philipp Friedrich, Heike-Karin Föll, Deanna Havas, Samuel Jeffery, Matthew Lutz Kinoy, R. B. Kitaj, Jean Leclercq, Justin Lieberman, August Macke, Luigi Ontani, Kirsten Pieroth, Nicolas Roggy, Aura Rosenberg, Emanuel Rossetti, Salvo, Ben Schumacher, Lucie Stahl, Studio for Propositional Cinema, Student Art Collective, Mitchell Syrop, Lilli Thießen, Astrid Wagner, Genichiro Yagyu, Min Yoon, HP Zimmer a.o.
Oracle, Joachimsthaler Straße 14, 10719 Berlin, oracle@theoracle.works, open by appointment

Last year, Tenzing Barshee curated a two-person exhibition with Anne Speier and Judy Fiskin at wellwellwell, Applied Arts University Vienna, and the exhibition Le Mérite. 2014-2016 at Treize in Paris. He co-curated Rochelle Feinstein's exhibition In Anticipation of Women's History Month with Fabrice Stroun for Centre d'Art Genève, the group show Passo Dopo Passo with Molly Everett and Dorota Michalska for Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Torino, and Margaret Honda's exhibition An Answer to 'Sculptures' with Fanny Gonella for Künstlerhaus Bremen. He's a regular contributor to Spike and Mousse magazine and a columnist for Starship magazine. He graduated the Postgraduate Programme in Curating in 2014.

This event on the Curating mailing archive: http://us4.campaign-archive2.com/?u=97fd3828d94e99dfeceaa8b3b&id=019d785630&e=614f2be470

Posted by Corner College Collective

Sunday, 19.03.2017
16:00h

 

2017 / 201703 / Buchvernissage / Finissage
High Times with Josefine
Finissage of Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy
Part II: Der Prozess / The Trial
With a reading from the book Josefine, by Saman Anabel Sarabi / high times

Saman Anabel Sarabi
 




Celebrating high times on a Sunday afternoon with a small reading out of the book Josefine, a special high time music set, some tea and gin. high times at Corner College: http://www.hightimepublishers.com

This event is part of the exhibition project Theorem 4. Aesthetic Agency and the Practices of Autonomy. Part II: Der Prozess / The Trial.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Saturday, 01.04.2017
16:30h -
Saturday, 06.05.2017

 

2017 / 201704 / 201705 / Ausstellung
Uriel Orlow personal exhibition
Geraniums Are Never Red

Uriel Orlow
 




Corner College, 01 April - 6 May 2017

Opening on Saturday, 01 April, 16:30h

17:00h Discussion between Uriel Orlow and TJ Demos

You can find here and read an interview with Uriel Orlow by Dimitrina Sevova in the context of the exhibition (also printable as PDF 3.65MB)

Opening Hours / Öffnungszeiten
Wed/Fri 15:00h – 18:00h
Thu 16:00h – 19:00h
or by appointment (+41-79-792 77 44)
Additionally open on Saturday, 6 May, from 14:00h to 18:00h


[English below]

In seiner Ausstellung im Corner College betrachtet Uriel Orlow die botanische Welt als Bühne für Geschichte und Politik im Allgemeinen. Die gezeigten Arbeiten wurden in den letzten zwei Jahren entwickelt und befassen sich mit dem Vermächtnis der botanischen Forschungsexpeditionen, Pflanzenmigration, Blumendiplomatie und botanischem Nationalismus aus dem doppelten Blickwinkel Südafrikas und Europas.

Die in der Ausstellung gezeigten Arbeiten sind Teil von Uriel Orlows laufendem Rechercheprojekt Theatrum Botanicum. Das Projekt sieht Pflanzen nicht einzig als passive Objekte der Natur, des ästhetischen Genusses, der Klassifizierung, der Bewirtschaftung oder des Naturschutzes; sondern sowohl als Zeugen als auch als Akteure der Geschichte, als dynamische Agenten, die Natur und Menschen, Tradition und Modernität verbinden, und das über unterschiedliche Geographien, Geschichten und Wissenssystemen hinweg, mit heilenden, spirituellen und ökonomischen Kräften.


[Deutsch oben]

In his exhibition at Corner College Uriel Orlow looks to the botanical world as a stage of history and politics at large. The work in the exhibition was developed over the last two years and engages with the legacies of botanical exploration, plant migration, flower diplomacy and botanical nationalism from the dual vantage points of South Africa and Europe.

***

European colonialism in South Africa – as elsewhere – was both preceded and accompanied by expeditions that aimed at charting the territory and classifying its natural resources, in turn paving the way for occupation and exploitation. 'Newly' discovered plants were often named after the botanist who first described them and eventually classified according to the Linnaean system and its particular European rationality.


What Plants Were Called Before They Had a Name (2016-17) is an audio plant dictionary created from nine indigenous South African languages. Conceived as a surround sound installation, the work serves as an aural repository of local knowledge that was originally passed from generation to generation through oral tradition but was displaced by European writing and nomenclature, which it now confronts in the exhibition space.

Geraniums are never Red (2016-17) revisits the bright red geraniums that trail from the balconies of Swiss chalets and clamber up palm trees in California. Botanically speaking they aren’t geraniums at all–nor are they Swiss or Californian. They are in fact pelargoniums. They were first brought to Europe – and misidentified – after 1652, when the Dutch East India Company established a permanent settlement and a Company Garden at the Cape and started to explore the surrounding flora to bring back new botanical treasures, which apart from pelargoniums included proteas, ericas and many other mainstays of European gardens. By the time the confusion between the two species was resolved, ‘African geraniums’ had been around for 150 years and British commercial growers and gardeners were reluctant to give up the familiar name.

In 1963, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the founding of Kirstenbosch, the national botanical garden of South Africa in Cape Town a series of films were commissioned to document the jubilee celebrations and their ‘national’ dances, pantomimes revisiting the colonial conquest, the visit of international botanists and the history of the botanical garden itself. The films’ cast of botanists and visitors are mostly white and when we see Africans they are engaged in menial labour.

These films have not been seen since 1963 and were found by the artist in boxes in the cellar of the library of the botanical garden. The Fairest Heritage (2016-7) is an attempt to watch these documents today and speak back to the archive. Orlow collaborated with the actor Lindiwe Matshikiza who inhabits and confronts the found footage and its politics of representation, sending up the botanical nationalism and flower-diplomacy of apartheid era South Africa.

Exotics were the pride of European gardeners for a long time. But new species were not just brought to Europe to satisfy horticultural demand and other colonial economic interests. Some plants also arrived as stowaways; seeds in animal feed or other shipments. The consequences of newly introduced species were not always predictable and in recent decades botanists have highlighted the threat of some of these new-arrivals to local biodiversity. A number of national organisations deal with the problem of invasive neophytes producing information campaigns and so-called blacklists of exotics that are illegal and need to be eradicated. The management of ‘invasive aliens’ and the language accompanying it produces new forms of botanical nationalism that inadvertently mirror public discourse on human migration. The series of posters Blacklisted (Was wir durch die Blume sagen) re-mixes information gathered from the Zurich office for the control of neophytes and uses quotes from literature and websites across Switzerland.

***

The work in this exhibition is part of Uriel Orlow's ongoing research entitled Theatrum Botanicum. The project considers plants not solely as passive objects of nature, aesthetic pleasure, classification, cultivation or conservation; but as both witnesses and actors in history and as dynamic agents linking nature and humans, tradition and modernity– across different geographies, histories and systems of knowledge, with curative, spiritual and economic powers.


Mit der freundlichen Unterstützung der Stiftung Erna und Curt Burgauer und der Ernst Göhner Stiftung.


Posted by Corner College Collective

Tuesday, 25.04.2017
19:30h

 

2017 / 201704
Talk by Melanie Boehi: Multispecies histories of South African colonial formations
followed by a discussion between her and Uriel Orlow

Melanie Boehi, Uriel Orlow
 


“String figures are like stories; they propose and enact patterns for participants to inhabit, somehow, on a vulnerable and wounded earth.” Donna Haraway, Staying with the Trouble, 2016, p. 10/String design installed in the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden’s annual section to prevent geese from eating young seedlings. Photograph by Melanie Boehi, December 2016.


This talk is concerned with histories of South African colonial formations featuring gardens and plants. It is grounded in empirical research of multispecies histories in the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden.

Plants have featured prominently in imaginations and conceptualisations of South Africa throughout the colonial, apartheid and post-apartheid era. In the late 19th century, white settlers appropriated the indigenous flora as a marker of identity. The settler elite regarded the cultivation of scientific and aesthetic appreciation of the vegetation as a tool for promoting civilisation and patriotism. This occurred within the larger discourse of nature conservation, which served as a legitimisation of white land appropriation, forced removals and prohibition of subsistence land use by Africans and slave-descendants.

In 1913, the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden was established in Cape Town. Subsequently, Kirstenbosch evolved as the centre of a network of regional botanical gardens spread throughout the country. In 2004, UNESCO listed Kirstenbosch as a natural World Heritage Site and it currently attracts over one million visitors per year. Through plant collecting, design and what I term “monumental gardening”, Kirstenbosch gave rise to South African colonial and imperial formations. These activities expressed the aspirations of the Cape colonial elite and evolved in the context of both rising South African settler nationalism and British imperialism. In 1948, the Nationalist Party came to power and apartheid became the official state policy. Parallel to the rise of local and international criticism of apartheid, the South African state began to use Kirstenbosch as a stage for political spectacles, deploying botanists as well as plants themselves as ambassadors in what I call “floral diplomacy”. Standing in a genealogy of empire exhibitions and flower shows, plants from Kirstenbosch were displayed internationally. The state also invited international botanists to South Africa in an attempt to impose a positive image of South Africa to them. The apartheid state deployed flowers and gardens because they were widely regarded as beautiful and apolitical – an understanding that needed to be continuously reproduced and in the late 1980s was challenged by activists and artists opposed to apartheid. The South African National Botanical Gardens have continued to thrive in the post-apartheid era. They have been reframed as tourism destinations and sites of post-apartheid nation building. However, they have been continuing to reproduce “colonial presents” (D. Gregory, The Colonial Present, 2004) and “occluded histories of empire” (A.-L. Stoler, Duress, 2016).

The talk is concerned with such histories of South African colonial formations. They are addressed from a multispecies perspective, which acknowledges not only humans but also other living beings, in particular plants, as historical actors and witnesses. It does so by drawing on and combining a range of methods, including historiography, multispecies ethnography, critical plant studies, plant sciences, and floriography (the reading and writing with flowers).

This event is part of the personal exhibition of Uriel Orlow at Corner College, Geraniums Are Never Red.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Sunday, 30.04.2017
17:00h

 

2017 / 201704 / Vortrag
Guest lecture of the Postgraduate Programme in Curating CAS/ MAS ZHdK
Joshua Simon: Verschüttete Traditionen // The Great Soviet Encyclopedia: Communism and The Dividual

Joshua Simon
 




[English below]

Der israelische Kurator Joshua Simon untersucht in seinem Vortrag “The Great Soviet Encyclopedia: Communism and The Dividual“ ein Poster von Eliezer Lissitzky (1890-1941), das der russisch-jüdische Künstler 1929 für die Eröffnung einer Ausstellung im Gewerbemuseum Zürich gestaltet hat. Es widerspiegelt den inszenierten Enthusiasmus über die forcierte Industrialisierung der Sowjetunion und die damit einhergehende veränderte Bedeutung des Individuums. Simon sieht Parallelen zu heutigen Formen von Subjektivität, was er auch in einem aktuellen Projekt untersucht hat: Die von ihm betreute Ausstellungsreihe „The Kids Want Communism“ (2016/17) öffnet den Blick auf das utopische Potenzial des Kommunismus, gerade auch in Israel, wo die sozialistischen Staats- und Gesellschaftstraditionen durch Globalisierung und Privatisierung verschüttet wurden.

Der Vortrag findet in englischer Sprache statt. Einführung: Dorothee Richter, Leiterin des „Postgraduate Programme in Curating“ an der Zürcher Hochschule der Künste (ZHdK).

Joshua Simon ist Autor, Filmemacher und Direktor des MoBY-Museums in Bat Yam. Er ist Mitbegründer von „Maayan Publishing“ in Tel Aviv, eines Magazins für Dichtung, Literatur und Ideen. Er ist Autor von „Neomaterialism“ (Sternberg Press, 2013) und Herausgeber von „Ruti Sela: For The Record“ (Archive Books, 2015). In letzter Zeit kuratierte er die Ausstellungen “Factory Fetish” in Melbourne und „Roee Rosen: Group Exhibition“ im Tel Aviv Museum. Er hat am renommierten Londoner Goldsmiths College ein Postgraduiertenstudium in „Curatorial Knowledge“ absolviert.


[Deutsch siehe oben]

The entry point for this talk is the Russian Exhibition which took place at the Museum of Applied Arts in Zurich (Marc-April 1929), and especially its poster, designed by Eliezer Lissitzky (1890-1941). The unique design of this poster by Lissitzky stands between avant garde montage and socialist realism with its inflated portraits and staged enthusiasm. These aesthetic attributes correlate with the shifting economic realities of the time with the move from the NEP to shockwork methods of the Soviet five year plan. This poster comes from a specific moment in Soviet industrialization which was accompanied by a new subjectivity as well. That moment seems to inform our moment as well.Considering this poster opens up a discussion on contemporary forms of subjectivity under current modes of production and distribution of computerized networks. In his talk, Joshua Simon will present The Kids Want Communism, a yearlong program of exhibitions marking 99 years since the October Revolution, which he initiated in collaboration with State of Concept Athens, Free/Slow University of Warsaw, Tranzit Prague, Skuc gallery in Ljubljana, the Visual Culture Research Center in Kiev, Westspace Melbourne, and MoBY-Museums of Bat Yam. The talk will outline how the communist horizon and real existing socialism can inform our understanding of the current social and cultural, political, and economic realities as we are facing the implosion of the neoliberal order.

The talk is a cooperation of Onamut and Postgraduate Programme in Curating, ZHdK and Corner College.

Posted by Corner College Collective

Tuesday, 09.05.2017
18:00h

 

2017 / 201705 / Buchvernissage
Buchvernissage
Christoph Kappeler: Josef Maria Schröder




Buchvernissage
Christoph Kappeler
Josef Maria Schröder

Edition Patrick Frey

Mit Texten von
Christoph Kappeler, Ulrich Kinder, Michael T. Ricker
Gestaltung
Hi, Megi Zumstein, Claudio Barandun
Gebunden, 152 Seiten, 153 Farbabbildungen
17 × 24 cm
ISBN Nummer: 978-3-906803-37-1
Sprache: Englisch

Einzelheiten zum Buch siehe bei Edition Patrick Frey.

> Flyer

Posted by Corner College Collective

Saturday, 13.05.2017
19:00h -
Saturday, 10.06.2017

 

2017 / 201705 / Ausstellung
PRESENT PROGRESSIVE
Abel Auer, Lisa Biedlingmaier, June Crespo, Ulrika Jäger, Bernadette Wolbring
 

[English below]

PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

Corner College, Zürich
Kuratiert von peekaboo! (Lisa Biedlingmaier & Bernadette Wolbring)

Teilnehmende KünstlerInnen: Abel Auer (DE), Lisa Biedlingmaier (CH / DE), June Crespo (ES / NL), Ulrika Jäger (DE), Bernadette Wolbring (DE / SE)

Eröffnung Samstag, 13. Mai 2017, 19:00h

Zusätzliche Veranstaltungen siehe unten.

Samstag, 13. Mai - Samstag, 10. Juni 2017

Öffnungszeiten
Mi: 15:00h - 18:00h
Do/Fr: 17:00h - 19:00h




Present Progressive; Zeitform, Englisch

Das Present Progressive ist eine Verlaufsform der Gegenwart. Dieses Tempus kann sich sowohl auf die Gegenwart als auch auf die Zukunft beziehen: Zum einen wird das Present Progressive für Handlungen, die jetzt gerade stattfinden, verwendet, zum anderen für sich ändernde Situationen und bereits vereinbarte Handlungen in der Zukunft. Dabei kommen vor allem Verben zum Einsatz, die einen Plan oder eine Bewegung von einem Ort oder einer Bedingung zur anderen vermitteln. Das Present Progressive ist eine Zeitform, die es im Deutschen nicht gibt.

peekaboo! präsentiert die Arbeiten von fünf KünstlerInnen, die sich mit Vorstellungen von Zeit und dem Ineinandergreifen von Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft beschäftigen. Recalling, reenacting und rewriting zum Beispiel sind Strategien, die wiederholt eingesetzt werden, um das Gewicht der Geschichte zu verlagern. Die Zeitreise wird als eine Möglichkeit vorgestellt, die Zukunft zu gestalten. Angeregt durch Chris Kraus´ „naive Vorstellung, dass es möglich ist dem Unglücklichsein zu entkommen, indem man einfach den Kanal wechselt“, hebt die Ausstellung Present Progressive die Gleichzeitigkeit von Ereignissen hervor – sei es in Vergangenheit, Gegenwart oder Zukunft.

Das Ausstellungsdesign besteht aus einem genau 68,38 m langen Gewebestreifen, der in Erinnerung ruft, dass es auch andere Vorstellungen von Zeit und zeitlichen Zusammenhängen gibt. Die Maße und die Materialität des Streifens beziehen sich nämlich auf den Teppich von Bayeux (entstanden im 11. Jh., 0,53m × 68,38m). Der Mediävist Peter Czerwinski stellt die These auf, dass im Mittelalter ein anderer Zeitbegriff existiert habe, der im Gegensatz zur heutigen Wahrnehmung der Zeit von einer Simultanität ausgehe (in Gegenwärtigkeit: Simultane Räume und zyklische Zeiten, Formen von Regeneration und Genealogie im Mittelalter, 1993). Kausal zusammenhängende Ereignisse, die in unterschiedlichen Zeitebenen stattfanden, wurden – laut Czerwinski – als gleichzeitig gedacht. Vergangenheit und Gegenwart sind in dieser Zeitvorstellung mithin nicht klar unterscheidbar. Darum werden auch auf dem Teppich von Bayeux Ereignisse, die nicht zeitgleich stattfanden, im selben Raum dargestellt, der lediglich durch Architekturelemente unterteilt wird.



Grundriss mit Skizzen für das Ausstellungsdesign für „Present Progressive“. // Floor plan with first drafts of the exhibition design for „Present Progressive“.


[Deutsch oben]

PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

Corner College, Zurich
curated by peekaboo! (Lisa Biedlingmaier & Bernadette Wolbring)

Participating artists:
Abel Auer (DE), Lisa Biedlingmaier (CH/DE), June Crespo (ES/NL), Ulrika Jäger (DE), Bernadette Wolbring (DE/SE)

Opening Saturday, 13 May 2017, 19:00h

Additional events see below.

Saturday, 13 May - Saturday, 10 June 2017

Opening hours
Mi: 15:00h - 18:00h
Do/Fr: 17:00h - 19:00h

­Present Progressive, tense, English

This tense is used to suggest either the present or the future. It can indicate that an action is going to happen in the future, especially with verbs that convey the idea of a plan or a movement from one place or condition to another.


peekaboo! presents the work of five artists that are dealing with perceptions of time and how past, present and future are interconnected. Strategies of recalling, reenacting and rewriting are applied in order to shift the weight of history. Travelling in time is presented as a way of shaping the future. Encouraged by Chris Kraus’s “naive recognition that it might be possible to escape from unhappiness just by changing the channel,” the show highlights the simultaneity of events – be it in the past, present or future.

The exhibition design consists of a 68.38m long strip of fabric running through the space to evoke a different idea of how time can be perceived. The strip’s measurements and materiality refer to the Bayeux Tapestry (0.53m × 68.38m). The German medievalist Peter Czerwinski claims that in the Middle Ages a different notion of time existed (in Gegenwärtigkeit: Simultane Räume und zyklische Zeiten, Formen von Regeneration und Genealogie im Mittelalter, 1993). In contrast to today’s chronological perception of time, the tapestry – like other medieval works of art – depicts a notion of time that assumes simultaneity. Here past and present are not clearly distinguishable – therefore causally related events are depicted in the same space, separated merely by elements of architecture.

Additional Events

Listening Sessions: RSI 92.3 FM Douala, Cameroon or any other proposals

Friday, 19 May, 5-6 pm
Thursday, 25 May, 5-7 pm
Friday, 26 May, 5-7 pm

“emotion reigns, information governs” is a thematic radio station dedicated to sports, music, and culture.

RSI is an avant-garde radio station featuring sports and cultural content. Created four years ago by Martin Camus Mimb, a renowned sports reporter on the African continent, the station is today the most listened-to radio in Douala, the economic capital of Cameroon. In the unique field of sports, we aim to give listeners a new vision of information, thanks to an experienced team of specialized reporters.

with Lisa Biedlingmaier

Posted by Corner College Collective

Friday, 19.05.2017
18:00h

 

2017 / 201705 / Vortrag
Guest lecture of the Postgraduate Programme in Curating CAS/ MAS ZHdK
Rohit Jain: How to Affect Postcolonial Public Spaces?

Rohit Jain
 




Who likes Chicken Curry? Who laughs about blackfacing and Mohamed caricature? Who defines arranged marriages? Who is scared of Indian IT-Workers? Who is involved in colonialism? Who survives? Who votes? Who really cares?

In this talk anthropologist and sociologist Rohit Jain inquires into the making of postcolonial public spaces of Switzerland in the age of de-centralised capitalism.

Informed by ethnographic and artistic research as well as from activist interventions Rohit delves into the unruly archives of forgotten stories, displaced feelings and interrogates the hegemonic machinery of making things und humans un/happen.

Starting from the transformative notion of „structure of feelings“ (Raymond Williams), the talk unravels the affective nature of postcolonial amnesia in Switzerland. On the hand, the resistance against postcolonial amnesia provokes melancholia, anxieties, or anger. On the other hand, to imagine alternative histories and stories allows to affect unruly archives and to unleash a performative power of assembly (Judith Butler).

Rohit Jain is, thus, interested in the conditions of possibilities as well as in the artistic, political and theoretical strategies to develop alternative publics of conviviality and new communities. The presented work, therefore, opens up new avenue for understanding an unacknowledged Swiss history of violence and envisioning a future of reparative justice at the intersection of ethnography, artistic practices and activism.

Rohit Jain is an anthropologist and anti-racism activist based at Zurich and Berne. His current work focuses on the connections between postcolonial archives, the politics of affects and the performative intervention into translocal publics. Rohit has done research and published on the entanglements of racism, humor and anti-PC in TV comedy, on transnational politics of representation among “second generations Indians” as well as on the connection between the Swiss public discourse of Bollywood, yoga and IT and postcolonial anxieties. Recently he has collaborated in artistic research projects on the “An/aesthetics of Suburbia” and on “Swiss Psychotropic Gold” (both at IFCAR Zurich) and on urban citizenship (at Shedhalle Zurich). He is co-founder of “Laugh Up. Stand Up! Antiracist Humor Festival” and of “Salon Bastarde”, a series of postmigrant happenings in Zurich.

The is a guest lecture of the Postgraduate Programme in Curating, ZHdK.

Posted by Corner College Collective