Mai 2018
05.05.2018 -
26.05.2018
2018 / 201805 / Ausstellung
Hinterland, Part 1
The eyes of the lighthouse

Cliona Harmey, Monica Ursina Jäger, Salvatore Vitale, VOLUMES
 
09.05.2018
2018 / 201805 / Buchvernissage / website launch
Book + Web Launch
Æther #1: Flughafen Kloten: Anatomie eines komplizierten Ortes


 

Juni 2018
02.06.2018 -
23.06.2018
2018 / 201806 / Ausstellung
Hinterland, Part 2
Blood as a rover

Jürgen Baumann, Gregory Collavini, David Jacques, Tuula Närhinen, Claudia Stöckli, VOLUMES
 

Saturday, 21.04.2018
14:00h

 

2018 / 201804 / Ausstellung
Event: Donatella Bernardi
From Abdizuel to Zymeloz
A Dependency Relationship: Does Feminism Need Separatism and / or Art?

Donatella Bernardi, Laura Iamurri, Quinn Latimer, Federica Martini, Angela Marzullo
 

Saturday, 21 April 2018, 14:00h: A Dependency Relationship: Does Feminism Need Separatism and / or Art?
With contributions by Laura Iamurri, Quinn Latimer, Federica Martini and Angela Marzullo


Program

14:00h Introduction by Donatella Bernardi

14:10h Lecture by Laura Iamurri, Carla Lonzi, Art Criticism, Feminism, and Writing

14:50h Talk by Angela Marzullo, including the projection of the film Let's spit on Hegel and the presentation of the book Home Schooling

15:20h Discussion between Laura Iamurri and Angela Marzullo

15:45h Break

16:00h Lecture by Federica Martini, Maria Lai: Sardinia, Venice and Antonio Gramsci

16:45h Discussion between Laura Iamurri and Federica Martini

17:00h Reading by Quinn Latimer

17:45h Conclusion of the afternoon

18:00h End



Laura Iamurri

Carla Lonzi, Art Criticism, Feminism, and Writing


Carla Lonzi, Autoritratto, Bari, Di Donato, 1969


Laura Iamurri, PhD, is Associate Professor of History of Modern Art and part of the doctoral program at the Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università Roma Tre.

She works and conducts researches on different types of artistic, editorial or institutional practices, visual cultures, and connections between artists, critics, periodicals, galleries, and museums in the 20th century, chiefly in Italy and with special attention to the political context. She curated the new edition of Carla Lonzi, Autoritratto (Milan, 2010) and co-curated Scritti sull’arte (with L. Conte and V. Martini; Milan, 2012). She has recently published the book Un margine che sfugge: Carla Lonzi e l’arte in Italia, 1955–1970 (Macerata, 2016).

Between 1969 and 1970 Carla Lonzi set aside her work as an art critic to found, along with artist Carla Accardi and journalist Elvira Banotti, one of the most radical movements in Italian feminism: Rivolta Femminile (Female Revolt). The process of transitioning from one field to another raises a series of questions on the role of art in the elaboration of Lonzi’s feminism; on her dialogue with artists Carla Accardi and Luciano Fabro; on the power gradient at stake in relationships between artists and critics; on writing; and on feminism as an irruption into history of an “unexpected subject,” able to redefine relationships on the basis of reciprocal recognition.



Quinn Latimer

Doubling the Line


Quinn Latimer and Paolo Thorsen-Nagel, Some City, 2014. HD Video, color, 8 min


Quinn Latimer is a poet, art critic, and editor from California whose work often explores feminist economies of writing, reading, and image production. Her most recent book is Like a Woman: Essays, Readings, Poems (Berlin, 2017), and she was editor-in-chief of publications for documenta 14.

In Doubling the Line, Latimer will discuss the constant loop between poetic and critical writing practices as they approach or attempt to narrate visual art production. Her talk will focus on feminist literary and art practices in particular, as examined in her most recent book.



Federica Martini

Maria Lai: Sardinia, Venice and Antonio Gramsci


Maria Lai, exhibition view, Roma, 2017


Federica Martini, PhD, is an art historian and curator. She worked in the Curatorial Departments of the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, Musée Jenisch Vevey, and Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne. From 2015 to 2016 she was a fellow of the Swiss Institute in Rome. From 2009 to 2017, she was head of the master’s program MAPS – Arts in Public Spheres at the Ecole Cantonale d’Art du Valais, Sierre (ECAV), and since 2009 she has also been part of the independent art space standard/deluxe, Lausanne. In January 2018, she was appointed Dean of Visual Arts at ECAV.

As a starting point for her contribution to From Abdizuel to Zymeloz, Federica Martini proposes two quotes by Maria Lai:

“Ero doppiamente straniera, sia per essere sarda, selvatica, primitiva, sia per essere l’unica donna tra gli allievi di Arturo Martini all’Accademia di Venezia. Arturo Martini era pur sempre di quella generazione che non dava spazio alle donne nell’arte. Qui si fa sul serio, diceva; la mia presenza era per lui un ingombro. Ma io non dubitavo di essere al posto giusto, anche se pensavo alla Sardegna e alla mia famiglia con il rimorso di un tradimento.”
Al Gigante lassù: Omaggio a Nivola, 2008.

“I was twice a stranger, first because I was Sardinian, wild, primitive, and second for being the only woman amongst Arturo Martini’s students at the Academy [Accademia di Belle Arti] in Venice. Arturo Martini was still from that generation that did not give women space in art. He used to say, ‘Here, we do it seriously;’ my presence was an obstacle for him. But I did not doubt that I was in the right place, even though I was thinking of Sardinia and of my family, with the remorse of a betrayal.”
Al Gigante lassù: Omaggio a Nivola (To the Giant Up There: Homage to Nivola), 2008.

“Sono partita dai quaderni di Gramsci: mi ha dato un’immagine, e da lì sono partita: avevo detto che l’arte deve arrivare all’uomo della strada. Quando un operaio per andare a lavorare fa sempre la stessa strada, non si accorge che il suo sguardo tocca le opere architettoniche che vede. Ma in questo modo lo sguardo acquista un ritmo.”

“I began with Gramsci’s notebooks [Prison Notebooks]. He gave me an image, and I started from there. He said that art must reach the man in the street. When a worker goes to work, doing the same commute every day, he doesn’t notice the architectural works he sees. However, in this way his gaze acquires a visual rhythm.”



Angela Marzullo

Sputiamo su Hegel


Angela Marzullo, Let’s Spit on Hegel, 2015. HD Video, color, 10 min


Angela Marzullo is an artist born in 1971 in Zurich, Switzerland, of Italian origin on her father’s side and Swiss on her mother’s. As a videographer, she combines video art and performance exploring feminist questions, which are at the heart of all her artistic endeavors. In 2010 she was awarded a residency at the Swiss Institute in Rome. During that year, she produced an experimental short film, Concettina, based on the Lutheran Letters of P. P. Pasolini, with her two daughters as the main actresses. Since 2003, she has undertaken a practice of critical artistic transmission through a new series of works.

Sputiamo su Hegel (Let’s Spit on Hegel, 2015, 10 min.) is the title of Angela Marzullo’s latest video, made in collaboration with Michael Hofer, the final work of a ten-year process of artistic research analyzing the critical thinking of the 1960s and 1970s and revitalizing such thinking with a feminist bent, through the voices of her two daughters, “starkids” Lucie and Stella. Sputiamo su Hegel is also the title of the book-length manifesto of Rivolta Femminile, the seminal group in Italian feminism, written by art critic Carla Lonzi.



Diese Veranstaltung ist Teil der Ausstellung From Abdizuel to Zymeloz von Donatella Bernardi. //
This event is part of the exhibition From Abdizuel to Zymeloz by Donatella Bernardi.


Die Ausstellung wird unterstützt von der Erna und Curt Burgauer Stiftung und der Georges und Jenny Bloch-Stiftung. //
The exhibition is supported by Erna und Curt Burgauer Stiftung and the Georges und Jenny Bloch-Stiftung.

Posted by Corner College Collective